SESDA2

Welcome to SESDA

Welcome to the Space and Earth Science Data Analysis (SESDA III) home page. SESDA III is the premier space and Earth science contract at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, held by ADNET Systems, Inc. ADNET, Wyle and Telophase form TEAM ADNET.

Approximately 300 scientists and engineers provide vital support to NASA under the SESDA III contract. Watch this site for exciting SESDA III news, events and job opportunities.

Read more about SESDA and ADNET Systems


SESDA Staff Support the Search for Dark Matter

April 24, 2014

SESDA staff at the Fermi Science Support Center are aiding in the dissemination of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope – data that are now providing the best evidence yet for the existence of dark matter at the center of our galaxy. Dark matter is believed to make up most of the material universe, but can’t be directly observed. Instead, scientists can use the LAT to look for evidence of the gamma-rays, which are thought to be released when dark matter particles collide or annihilate each other.
New LAT data from the center of the Milky Way Galaxy show that this area produces a higher flux of gamma-rays than can be explained by known gamma-ray sources, such as pulsars and cosmic-ray collisions. This excess is consistent with what would be expected from dark matter.


At left is a map of gamma-rays with energies between 1 and 3.16 GeV detected in the galactic center by Fermi's LAT; red indicates the greatest number. Prominent pulsars are labeled. Removing all known gamma-ray sources (right) reveals excess emission that may arise from dark matter annihilations. Image Credit: T. Linden, Univ. of Chicago.
At left is a map of gamma-rays with energies between 1 and 3.16 GeV detected in the galactic center by Fermi’s LAT; red indicates the greatest number. Prominent pulsars are labeled. Removing all known gamma-ray sources (right) reveals excess emission that may arise from dark matter annihilations. Image Credit: T. Linden, Univ. of Chicago.



SESDA staff are working to improve the efficiency and reliability of the LAT data server, which is the main portal through which scientists access Fermi data. More information about this research can be found here:
http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/fermi-data-tantalize-with-new-clues-to-dark-matter/index.html#.U1aQ7VfHhzY

GES DISC/USGS Collaboration Leads to More Effective Hydrological Data Analysis

April 17, 2014

GES DISC/USGS Collaboration Leads to More Effective Hydrological Data Analysis
The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is home to North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) as well as Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) hydrological data. These data can be downloaded for analysis using the Giovanni visualization tool developed and maintained in part by SESDA team members at GES DISC. These data sets, which include variables such as rain rate, soil moisture, surface runoff, snowfall rate, and total evapotranspiration, are particularly useful for regional hydrological studies, and can be used to analyze the similarities and differences between observations and model data.

The usefulness of NLDAS and GLDAS data has been enhanced by a recent collaboration between the GES DISC and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The collaboration makes NLDAS and GLDAS areal statistics data available for download via the USGS Geo Data Portal (GDP). Users can access and acquire the data from GDP for specific geographical areas, such as states or countries, or they can input their own area of interest as a “shapefile” and acquire the data for just that specific area. This enhancement makes the data more compatible with Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and more easily incorporated into GIS analyses. More importantly, the ability to use irregularly-shaped boundaries for analysis through the GDP may allow a more accurate representation of these data.

As a demonstration of the difference between a simple analysis of NLDAS data performed using Giovanni and with the GDP, the dramatic impact of Hurricane Irene in 2011 on the state of Vermont was selected. Comparison of two time-series plots (below) shows subtle differences due to the large rectangular area used for the Giovanni plot (right graph) and the ability to restrict the area to just the state of Vermont in the GDP plot (left graph). The graph generated by the GDP data provides a better depiction of Irene’s surface runoff peak within the state of Vermont than the area-wide graph generated using Giovanni.

For more information about this collaboration, check out the GES DISC webpage: http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gesNews/nldas_gldas_gdp_hurricane_irene

Intranet Portal

Intranet Login